Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy


RJLPP REGION IN REVIEW BLOG

Welcome to the Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy's Region in Review blog covering regional legal issues. As one of the first law journals to provide online-exclusive commentary, the blog provides fresh and dynamic perspectives on the region's emerging questions of law and policy. We are always accepting contributions that focus on current, region-centric topics. If you are interested in contributing, please email rutgers.jlpp.blog@gmail.com. Submissions should be no longer than 3,000 words.  

-RJLPP Editorial Board

2015 Symposium: New Legal Strategies to Prevent Drug Overdoses

Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy was pleased to host the 2015 Symposium: New Legal Strategies to Prevent Drug Overdoses. The editorial board would like to thank the attending speakers: Rosanne Scotti, State Director of New Jersey Drug Policy Alliance; Rebecca Ricigliano, Senior Staff Member of Attorney General Hoffman’s Office; and Harry Earle, Chief of Police of Glouster Township. 

Volume 12, Issue 2: Current Issues in Public Policy

The Editorial Board is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 12, Issue 2 of the Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy. This issue includes articles on a variety of topics such as the need for a copyright standard for characters in a series, misclassifying employees as independent contractors, a legislative solution for orphan works, the online gambling conflict between state laws and the WTO decision, and how insurance companies can mount challenges to a bank-centric designation. 

Trademark Infringement: Third Circuit Offers Guidance on Evidence Needed to Satisfy Irreparable Harm in Preliminary Injunctions

By: Heather Schubert

February 17, 2015

The Supreme Court rulings in eBay and Winter have caused the federal circuit courts to question the presumption of irreparable harm in the trademark context for a preliminary injunction. Recently, the Third Circuit ruled an inference of irreparable harm can be found from the evidence established. Does this ruling help clarify the test or further the growing circuit split?

Volume 12, Issue 1: Current Issues in Public Policy

The Editorial Board is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 12, Issue 1 of the Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy. This issue includes articles on topics such as New Jersey’s Overdose Prevention Act as well as Fourth Amendment implications on the use of night vision goggles by law enforcement personnel. This issue also includes a transcript of the 2014 Rutgers Health Law Society symposium on organ donation.   

Terminable-at-Will Clauses and Executory Contracts in Bankruptcy: An Examination of Third Circuit Treatment and Practitioner Guidance

By: Brett Buterick

January 22, 2015

At present, Third Circuit bankruptcy courts have not addressed the issue of dissolution of an executory contract on the basis of a terminable-at-will provision. How should the Third Circuit bankruptcy courts address this issue? What are practical positions for contracting parties when dealing with terminable-at-will provisions?

Volume 11, Issue 4: Current Issues in Public Policy

The Editorial Board is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 11, Issue 4 of the Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy. This issue includes articles on a variety of topics such as population losses in large American cities, antitrust violations of reverse payments, and the enactment of Parent Trigger laws. 

Volume 11, Issue 3: Current Issues in Public Policy

The Editorial Board is pleased to announce the publication of Volume 11, Issue 3 of the Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy. This issue includes articles on a variety of topics such as domestic violence in religious communities, unpaid internships, reforming the Toxic Substances Control Act, how the Eighth Amendment guarantees gender reassignment surgery in prisons, and the need for properly tailored anti-piracy laws. 

Gay Bashing, Trans Slayings, and the Reasons Why LGBTQ Philadelphians Remain Woefully Unsafe in 2014

By: Alexi Velez

December 2, 2014

The “gay bashing” of a Philadelphia couple in September 2014 was widely covered by national news outlets. In the wake of the attack, it became apparent that LGBTQ Philadelphians find limited benefit, if any, in current state and federal hate crime statutes. Additionally, there was a striking disparity between reactions to the September attack and past attacks suffered by transgender Philadelphians. Why are hate crime laws unavailing? Why have hate-driven crimes against transgender individuals been treated so differently?