Rutgers Journal of Law & Public Policy


Volume 11, Issue 1: Fragmented Risk Symposium

Vol10Issue4
Volume 11, Issue 1: Fragmented Risk Symposium
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FRAGMENTED RISK: AN INTRODUCTION 
By: JAY M. FEINMAN
 
Consider two potential paradoxes about the breadth and limits of insurance, one in property insurance and one under the Commercial General Liability ("CGL") policy.[read more]
 
 
After a catastrophic weather event ("CAT"), such as a hurricane, there inevitably arise disputes over the cause of property damage, with losses attributable to flooding assigned to policies issued under the National Flood Insurance Program, and losses attributable to wind assigned to policies issued by private insurers and/or by various state-based residual risk pools.[read more]
 
 
Would having insureds select each coverage for every peril and exposure available result in better insurance selection and better customer satisfaction?[read more]
 
 

THE HIDDEN CONFLICT: THE SECRET INSURERS DON'T TELL INSUREDS 
By: MICHAEL CHILDRESS AND DANIEL LOUCKS

The insurance industry operated for centuries under certain fundamental principles. An insured, looking to minimize its own risk, looks to purchase an insurance policy. [read more]

 

When interpreting insurance contracts, the legal system often makes reference to the expectations of the reasonable insured.[read more]

 

One of the fascinating, but disheartening aspects of history is the manner in which some persons or events are continually trumpeted, even if overrated, while others are too quickly forgotten.[read more]